Sex Trafficking Awareness

 Most cases go unreported. PC: Yeimy Rodriguez

Most cases go unreported. PC: Yeimy Rodriguez

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On Saturday afternoon, Oct. 21, 300 people, including Union’s Social Justice Club, were the hands and feet of Jesus as they gathered downtown to march in the fifth annual No Girl For Sale-Walk for Freedom. The walk started at the University of Nebraska Lincoln’s Student Union and ended at the Capitol building.

“The club is run entirely by students and they plan everything,” comments guest services director and Social Justice Club sponsor, Marcia Nordmeyer. “We did the I’ve Got A Name walk last year and they continue to do so in hopes that other cities will follow Nebraska’s example to end sex trafficking.”

The walk was put on by the organization I’ve Got A Name, which was founded by Bob Burton and is directed by Paul Yates. Their mission is to fight sex trafficking in Nebraska. “They bring awareness to human sex trafficking, specifically for girls,” comments sophomore business administration major and club treasurer Yeimy Rodriguez. “Sex trafficking is a big issue so it’s good to have an organization that is fighting it.”

Along with the walk, Senator Patty Pansing-Brooks gave a speech about a new bill she sponsored that the legislature passed. The bill includes the police going after the perpetrators instead of the victims, and the bill will encompass the entire state and eventually the states surrounding us. “Especially with the I-80 highway. That’s where the traffickers used to take the girls and transport them to other places,” comments sophomore international rescue and relief major and club president Raquel Amich. “The bill from Senator Pansing-Brooks is going to be very beneficial to the movement and also the state.”

Sex trafficking is a serious problem not only in Nebraska but all across the United States. The Social Justice Club is bringing awareness to the organization I’ve Got A Name to help them carry out their mission to eradicate sexual exploitation and sex trafficking through education, prayer and financial support.

The event raised more than $8,000 for I’ve Got a Name and they’re still taking donations, so it isn’t too late to help out. “The No Girl for Sale Walk was an amazing experience,” comments sophomore international relations major Daniel Delgado. “It was so nice to see the citizens of Lincoln from all ages come out to support an ongoing issue as big as this, and it’s also never too late to donate to them.”

Visit their website at www.ivegotaname.org to find out more ways to donate, volunteer, or even host events and help spread their message of ending sex trafficking once and for all. One small decision can help this organization help millions of girls in need. 


Caroline Guchu is a junior studying communications.